Ayurveda Foundations – Part 1

posted in: Ayurveda 9

 

Reflections

  1. How you would imagine using Sankhya Philosophy in daily life?
  2. Think of an example of a guna expressing in both an “inanimate” object, and an example of the same guna expressing in the body.
  3. Give an example of what you would do to bring balance if you had too much of one guna expressing in your body.

 

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9 Responses

  1. Danielle+Harris
    | Reply

    Interesting, I have done a bit of study on this but more so on the Doshas and combination of food. It was good to go right back to the root level. Looking forward to this module

  2. Karina
    | Reply

    1. I have translated using Sankhya Philosophy in one’s life as being:
    – presence
    – pause
    – mindfulness
    -balance
    Being present in moments, pausing before action, being mindful and balance.

    2. Inanimate object- potato (heaviness)
    In body- lethargy.

    3. Bringing balance; eating fresh fruit or salads which are easier to digest and lighter on the digestive system.

  3. Coral Ann Gilmore
    | Reply

    1. Awareness, presence, appreciation – Having an awareness of all that is ‘you’ . Being present in your own self both mind and body, and taking nothing for granted. Taking time to pause and appreciate of all that is around you.
    2. Inanimate object – heater
    too much heat manifesting in the body.
    3. To bring balance – eating cooling foods eg cucumber, watermelon, yoghurt, drinking coconut water and avoiding eating foods that heat the body eg chilli, garlic, ginger and drinking alcohol etc

  4. Alina Fogarty
    | Reply

    Wow, I am loving this already, all the things, all the layers!

    1. How you would imagine using Sankhya Philosophy in daily life?
    Given that Ayerveda is a system designed to find the truth in our life. I think that means looking at all aspects of our selves and how we fit into the world, to be able to identify, manage and heal thy self in totality. Another piece of the puzzle that is Yoga, a state of being., a true knowing of self. I believe Sankhya to be a lifestyle in balance between a state consciousness and an awareness of our entire human body and all of nature working in alignment. Through Yoga Practices, self-reflection, journaling and continued learning and adjusting is how I believe I would use Sankhya in my life. Seeking acknowledgement, improvement and balance and inviting in an awareness of mu changes or factors that might impact balance from day to day, week to week, month to month etc.

    2. Think of an example of a guna expressing in both an “inanimate” object, and an example of the same guna expressing in the body.

    Guna expressing in an inanimate object – Weather Temperature (Cold or Hot)
    Guna expressing in the body – Chills, Body Strain, Quick breath, Ice, Moisture, Rushing or Fever, Slow Breath, Fire, lethargy, HEAT.

    3. Give an example of what you would do to bring balance if you had too much of one guna expressing in your body.

    When a guna or quality expresses itself in your body, you would typically respond by seeking out the opposite kama or action to seek balance and prevent dis-ease.

    Too much Cold – Seek more warmth in clothing, perhaps blankets, more physical practices, more substantial food/fluids, luxurious textures, warm thoughts and colours, weighted supports, props.

    Too much Hot – Seek more coolness by lighter or less clothing, cooler foods/fluids, lighter textures, cool bathing, gentle practices, fresh cool images and colours, minty tastes, cool breeze.

    Whilst adjusting and applying the opposite being mindful of not over compensating when looking to do the opposite and restore balance to also monitor for ongoing balance.

  5. Hayley Cooper
    | Reply

    1. How would you imagine using Sankhya philosophy in daily life?
    – To acknowledge when the mind and body may be out of balance and why.
    – Taking time to be fully present in the moment and become aware of the ‘you’ that is within, beyond the physical form or body.
    – Appreciation and gratitude for all that we have and all that is around us. Admiring the beauty and magic that is in all things.

    2. Think of an example of a guna expressing in both an ‘inanimate’ object and an example of the same guna expressing in the body.
    – Inanimate object: A large rock or boulder (Heavy)
    – Same guna expressing itself in the body: Physical heaviness (body aches and pains, cramping, lethargy, muscle weakness, stagnation, digestion issues, weight gain) or Energetic heaviness (heavy sensation around the heartspace, overwhelm, over emotional, sadness, grief, heartache, energetic stagnation or blockages)

    3. Give an example of what you would do to bring balance if you had too much of one guna expressing in your body.
    I would implement tools and practices into daily life that can help restore and bring balance. If there is too much of one guna expressing itself in the body, I would look to seek out actions that support and draw in the opposite guna.

    Example: too much heaviness in the body would require more lightness to help prevent dis-ease and/or mental health conditions such as depression.

    How to bring balance: spend more time outside in nature, increased exposure to sunlight and vitamin D, meditation, gratitude and journalling practices to get thoughts out on to paper, eat light nourishing meals to support digestion, drink plenty of water, breath practices and mantra.

  6. Evelyn+Radomyski
    | Reply

    1. How would you imagine using Sankhya philosophy in daily life?
    Limit the concept of good and bad – for the most positive outcomes, seek out balance, within our bodies
    as much as within our daily living.

    2. A guna expressed as a) an inanimate object and b) in the body.
    a) Guru – a ball that doesn’t bounce.
    b) Guru – Uterine pressure during menstruation.

    3. How would you bring a guna into balance if it was in excess in your body?
    Using the same example, for heaviness during menstruation – Guru, bring lightness by immersing body
    in water, either a bath or a pool.

  7. Cassandra Dzieczko
    | Reply

    I haven’t really done or learnt much with Ayurveda, but I’m keen to learn more. I think as a starting point to look into this more, for a more balanced and healthier life and to be able to come into myself to be more present in life. Getting back to nature and spending more time outdoors doing the things I love. To be able to work on tools to have for myself, while listening to my own body, that will allow myself to come into balance.

  8. Tracy
    | Reply

    1. How you would imagine using Sankhya Philosophy in daily life?

    Bringing balance into life with awareness of gunas
    Sense of self as individual and connection to others, nature, world & universe
    Mindful of consumption – food, interactions & how time is spent.
    Appreciation of surroundings and the miracles of all that is.

    2. Think of an example of a guna expressing in both an “inanimate” object, and an example of the same guna expressing in the body.

    Stage lighting – heat
    Body – night sweats, heat stroke, sunburn, body temp

    3. Give an example of what you would do to bring balance if you had too much of one guna expressing in your body.

    To bring balance of too much heat – cool shower rather than hot, swim in pool/river, eat cooling foods with high water content such as watermelon or cucumber, less spicy foods, seek out a cool spot in nature such as under a large shady tree with a cool breeze.

  9. Haylee Fox
    | Reply

    1. Based on my quite limited understanding (this topic needs some much deeper study for me to really feel like I grasp it), I would use Sankhya philosophy in my every day life as journey. This would start with reading about the philodsophy, then contemplation and meditation of the philosophy and then using it in a yoga practice (an embodied and authentic experience). Similar to a yoga practice, Sankhya moves through the gross and the subtle layers of our existence and ultimately requires a realisation of difference between spirit and matter. To me, it seems like a path of yoga, and with greater understanding of the philosophy i could use these understandings in my yoga practice.

    2. Drava – the ocean and menstural blood, amniotic fluid, lymphatic fluid

    3. Too much Manda – eat light foods, eat (healthy) energising foods, a yoga practice (asanas, pranayama, kriyas) that increase tapas and flow of prana

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